Posts Tagged ‘mining’

Bodie Ghost Town Church

bodie-church

In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880! By that time, the town of Bodie bustled with families, robbers, miners, store owners, gunfighters and prostitutes of all kinds. At one time there was reported to be 65 saloons in town. Amongst the saloons were numerous brothels and ‘houses of ill repute’, gambling halls and opium dens. Needless to say that there was entertainment for every taste.

After a long day working the claims, the miners would head for the bars and the red light district to spend their earnings. The mixture of money, gold and alcohol would often prove fatal. It is said that there was a man killed every day in Bodie. Presumably, the undertaker never had a slow day.

There are records that say that William Body took a ship from New York, around the horn to end up in San Francisco. The name of the town was changed at some point in time, before the majority of the people made their way to Bodie. There are different stories as to why – one says it was to keep the correct pronunciation of town’s namesake. Another says that the sign painter didn’t have the room for the tail of the lower-case “y”.

There’s a story about a little girl whose family moved from San Francisco to Bodie. She wrote “Goodbye God, I’m going to Bodie”.

(above written on Bodie.com)

An average of one murder a day!?  What a wild place!  Was the church empty or was it a safe haven and packed with those seeking refuge from the dangerous streets of drunken greedy miners?  Perhaps Sundays the church pews would fill with those seeking forgiveness from the prior weeks blurred late nights of gambling, drinking and violence.  In any matter, I was most intrigued by the church in this old ghost town of the wild west.  As my mind often works with making images, I wanted to make a time exposure in hopes of getting some movement in the clouds – and therefore a further dynamic to the image.  Once I put on the dark filter and started my 60 second exposures, I realized the possibility of achieving the “ghost affect” with the other tourists visiting Bodie.  Then, of course, it clicked!  How perfect to try and have a ghost-like affect in a ghost town!