Posts Tagged ‘square’

A Sweet Goodbye to La Jolla

Sun Star Pier, La Jolla, California, August 6, 2009

Within days of moving to La Jolla 3 1/2 years ago, I discovered this local landmark – the Scripps Pier, and immediately was drawn to it photographically.  I didn’t have any previous connection to pier’s or other of man’s constructions along the water’s edge, but that would change living in La Jolla – and in large part because of this pier.  I returned every sunset for nearly 3 weeks to get my first successful image of this pier – Time.  That particular photograph really started a new direction for my photography and made my work more personal.  It would be fair to say that that image marked the beginning of working on my own aesthetic and creating my own images, as opposed to looking at others and trying to replicate.  I imagine that most photographers and artists go through similar stages – it begins with trying to make the work you look up to and respect, and once you feel capable and have learned the techniques involved and the process, then you can begin to find your own aesthetic and create a new style that is more unique.  Well, this photograph – Time, and the process of making it and having to be patient and go out night after night before I got everything right, had much to do with getting me on my own path as an artist.

Prior to this time, once I had a successful image of a location, I would generally not return to shoot it further.  Why mess with a good thing?  That too changed in La Jolla, and again, in large part because of this pier.  After several months, I had began to learn much about this tunnel-view composition and what I was drawn to about it.  It hung in the front of the gallery that I spent much time in and had the opportunity to speak with the public about the photo.  This furthered my feelings and understanding of the piece.  A desire to shoot it again arose and within a year, after many visits, I had made a second image that I felt to be a success – Fog.

Through the first 2 years, I made, what I would call – 2 successful images that were “gallery worthy”.  In my third year, I went through a major aesthetic change in my work and went from shooting primarily bright Fuji Velvia color panoramic work to dark and moody black and white squares.  There were a number of reasons behind this – a darker mood and life outlook due to events in my life; a feeling that color was too often distracting the viewer of more clear communication that didn’t seem to be the case with black and white; finding myself more drawn personally on an artistic level to cleaner, simpler works; feeling that the most challenging image to make, yet perhaps most rewarding, is the one that is most simple in it’s elements yet still holds a dynamic with the viewer, this leading to continually eliminating elements which eventually led to eliminating color – to name a few.  In the end, this transition came completely naturally and with ease and my shooting was invigorated like never before.  I began to re-shoot many of the compositions that I had become familiar with in the area, and found many new ones and ways of making images.   At the end of a string of, yet many more visits, I had made my third successful image, and perhaps my best (favorite) yet – Passage.

Through 3 1/2 years in La Jolla, I would say it’s safe to say I have photographed the Scripps Pier over 100 sunsets.  I have certainly thought that it would be cool to capture an image with the sun setting down the center of the corridor, and at one point, I made some conscious pursuit at it, but my timing was off and I never really followed through with it and never got closer than a week of the right time.  I guess it wasn’t so important to me that I find the exact day or two of the year that it’s do-able.  To be honest, I’m really not that much of a planner and it goes against my style completely to turn the art into a science and research as to the exact time and earthly coordinates blah!  That would be one quick way to take the joy out of photographing, for me.

So, you could call it sweet karma, randomness, coincidence, dumb luck, or whatever you’d like, but on my final evening in La Jolla before moving away, I decide to head out one last time to shoot Scripps Pier at sunset.  I’m super-busy packing and cleaning, and generally waiting until the last minute, like I do.  As I arrive at the pier, it’s 5 minutes from sunset and I can see that the sun is lining up better than I have ever seen.  This is pretty cool, I think as I set up the tripod.  Just as I get the camera set and my settings in order, the sun clips the upper right corner of the frame at the end of the corridor.  Sweet! I take about 8-10 exposures, bracketing and trying different f-stops before settling on f/22 to get the more dramatic starburst.  The sun is visible in the frame for about 3 minutes before it moves north out of sight in this composition.

To get this on my last night in La Jolla!  Pretty cool indeed.  Now, I suppose I’m ready to move on outta here and go start over in a new area -

Maui will work…

time1Time, 2006

fogFog, 2007

pier-placewebsitePassage, 2009


Yosemite Falls -and- It’s Not Cold…It’s Invigorating!

yosemite-fallsYosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America. Located in Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, it is a major attraction in the park, especially in late spring when the water flow is at its peak.
The total 739 metres (2,420 ft) from the top of the upper falls to the base of the lower falls qualifies Yosemite Falls as the sixth highest waterfall in the world, though with the recent discovery of Gocta Cataracts in Venezuela, it appears on some lists as seventh.
Although often referred to as a “two-stage drop”, the falls actually consist of three sections:
Upper Falls: The 1,430 ft plunge alone is among the twenty highest waterfalls in the world. Trails from the valley floor and down from other park areas outside the valley lead to both the top and base of Upper Yosemite Falls. The upper fall is formed by the swift waters of Yosemite Creek, which, after meandering through Eagle Creek Meadow, hurl themselves over the edge of a hanging valley in a spectacular and deafening show of force.
Middle Cascades: Between the two obvious main plunges there are a series of five smaller plunges collectively referred to as the Middle Cascades. Taken together these account for a total drop of 670 ft, more than twice the height of the Lower Falls. Because of the narrow, constricted shape of the gorge in which these drops occur and the lack of public access, they are rarely noted. Most viewpoints in the valley miss them entirely. Several vantage points for the cascades are found along the Yosemite Falls trail. Several hikers climbing down from the trail towards the cascades have required an expensive helicopter rescue due to steep and slippery terrain and features.
Lower Falls: The final 320 ft drop adjacent to an accessible viewing area, provides the most-used viewing point for the waterfalls. Yosemite Creek emerges from the base of the Lower Falls and flows into the Merced River nearby. Like many areas of Yosemite the plunge pool at the base of the Lower Falls is surrounded by dangerous jumbles of talus made even more treacherous by the high humidity and resulting slippery surfaces.
In years of little snow, the falls may actually cease flowing altogether in late summer or fall. A very small number of rock climbers have taken the opportunity to climb the normally inaccessible rock face beneath the falls, although this is an extraordinarily dangerous undertaking; a single afternoon thunderstorm could restart the falls, sweeping the climbers off the face.
The Lower Falls are easily accessible near the Yosemite Lodge in Yosemite Valley. The top of the Upper Falls may be reached via a steep, strenuous, and usually crowded 3.50 mi hike beginning near the Sunnyside Walk-in Campground. The Upper Falls may also be reached via several routes from the Tioga Road to the north.    (from Wikipedia.org)

I had hiked Half Dome the day before and today was happy to be chillin’ with family and friends down along the Merced River in Yosemite Valley.  This area is called swinging bridge, though the bridge there doesn’t swing much.  Perhaps an old bridge that is no longer there had a little more swing to it??  Anyways, this was a perfect place to spend the better part of the day barbecuing, biking to nearby scenic spots, playing with our nieces and nephew, and simply enjoying the river.  This view is from the bridge and I liked it very much.  I mean, come on – it’s incredible!  I waited for the afternoon clouds to form and then used my dark filter to lengthen the exposure along with a nd grad – and voila! – here it is, one of my favorite images from the trip!

I’m not sure if I was just coming off the high from climbing Half Dome the day before or being wooed by the river, but I soon got in my mind that I had to swim across this – the Merced River.  It certainly wasn’t for others.  That was actually the main deterrent – the number of people that were around and on the bridge throughout most of the day.  There would generally be a couple dozen people lingering around most of the time and I didn’t want this to be a “stunt”, but I decided I had to do it regardless and I’d have to just block them all out.  Most every sane person would tell you the water was “freakin’ cold”!  In fact, coming down from Half Dome the day before we stopped around Little Yosemite to enjoy the river for a spell and I put my head in the water for 10 seconds only to get severe brain freeze.  Yes, you could say it was VERY cold, but my experience with cold water is that you can’t tell yourself it’s cold – so I blocked those thoughts out and rephrased them in my mind to use words like refreshing and invigorating.

I tried to recruit another to take on this challenge but couldn’t find anyone to make that tweak in their mind from cold to refreshing!  I was on my own.  It’s fine, no one has ever died from 90 seconds of cold water, I told myself.  As the time neared and I stripped down to my board shorts, I tried to remain focused and just not think much about it.  I got Rebecca setup with the camera so she could take pictures (this could be great stock) and then headed over to the beach to the left of this scene.  The idea was to swim from there, straight out into the middle of the river and let the current take me under the bridge and exit a little down river by the bbq area.  I didn’t wait long and I ran into the water and began to swim quite hard.  The refreshing and invigorating water stung my skin and where I initially wanted to keep my hand down and stroke, I quickly found that I had to breathe more.  Putting my head up, I saw that the current was taking me, maybe a little quicker than anticipated, toward the middle pylon of the bridge and a log jam-up.  I stroke harder and missed it by a couple of feet.  By the time I was 3/4 of the way across, I was getting tired and my freestyle stroke turned to a sidestroke, and of course this happened right where there was a circular current in the river that was stopping my forward momentum.  I was ready to be out!  20 seconds more of strong swimming and I was at the edge.  My skin felt like it was on fire and I had a bit of a headache – but no goose-bumps!  That’s because I never told myself it was cold.

Later I began to recollect, a thought from deep within my memory banks (or made up completely..), that my brother had swam across this river as a boy.  I would have been too young to attempt it at the time, but I wondered if this were why I had felt such a strong desire to swim this.  To match him on something that I couldn’t have done at the time.  I’m still not sure if I am remembering this right or not – I’ll have to ask him, but I thought it interesting anyways.  What compels us to do the things we do?  Are all our thoughts and compulsions rooted in some previous experience?

Anyways, it was a wonderful experience and a challenge.  I find when I’m in nature I come up with these challenges for myself more frequently and naturally than I do in the “real world”, and that is certainly one of the things I love about nature.  I am absolutely positive in saying – I am happiest while in nature!

scott-swim


Bodie Ghost Town Church

bodie-church

In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880! By that time, the town of Bodie bustled with families, robbers, miners, store owners, gunfighters and prostitutes of all kinds. At one time there was reported to be 65 saloons in town. Amongst the saloons were numerous brothels and ‘houses of ill repute’, gambling halls and opium dens. Needless to say that there was entertainment for every taste.

After a long day working the claims, the miners would head for the bars and the red light district to spend their earnings. The mixture of money, gold and alcohol would often prove fatal. It is said that there was a man killed every day in Bodie. Presumably, the undertaker never had a slow day.

There are records that say that William Body took a ship from New York, around the horn to end up in San Francisco. The name of the town was changed at some point in time, before the majority of the people made their way to Bodie. There are different stories as to why – one says it was to keep the correct pronunciation of town’s namesake. Another says that the sign painter didn’t have the room for the tail of the lower-case “y”.

There’s a story about a little girl whose family moved from San Francisco to Bodie. She wrote “Goodbye God, I’m going to Bodie”.

(above written on Bodie.com)

An average of one murder a day!?  What a wild place!  Was the church empty or was it a safe haven and packed with those seeking refuge from the dangerous streets of drunken greedy miners?  Perhaps Sundays the church pews would fill with those seeking forgiveness from the prior weeks blurred late nights of gambling, drinking and violence.  In any matter, I was most intrigued by the church in this old ghost town of the wild west.  As my mind often works with making images, I wanted to make a time exposure in hopes of getting some movement in the clouds – and therefore a further dynamic to the image.  Once I put on the dark filter and started my 60 second exposures, I realized the possibility of achieving the “ghost affect” with the other tourists visiting Bodie.  Then, of course, it clicked!  How perfect to try and have a ghost-like affect in a ghost town!



Mono Lake

mono-lakeWe were leaving Yosemite and coming back across the Tioga Pass. Unlike the day a week prior when we had beautiful blue skies with the occassional puffy white cloud, on this day it was stormy, cold and wet. It certainly did not dampen my mood and I was pulling the truck over every few miles for “a quick 2-minute shooting stop” – as I explained to my friends – their patience reached sage-like-levels this day…thanks!

We came down the other side of the pass on our way to Oh Ridge Campground along June Lake, our home for the next couple of nights. It was dark and stormy out over Mono Lake and it looked perfect. I was so anxious to get there and knew that this could be the best chance I get over the days, but all my companions just wanted to get to camp and there was no way they were gonna allow “a quick 1-hour (!) shooting stop”. We checked in to Oh Ridge, found our campsite, switched it to a better one (#61…nice view of the lake), and unpacked the vehicles. Thankfully, my sweetheart knew how antsy I was and once the truck was unloaded, told me to go and her and her sister would setup camp. My buddy Dale and I jump in the truck and go.

Oh Ridge Campground seems to be the perfect place to camp if you want to shoot Mono Lake, and we were parked and walking down to it’s shores within 20 minutes. You could see the rain falling down over the lake. I love this weather! I thought to myself over and over.

I had shot only 6 or 7 minute long exposures when the wind hit us in the face. The storm and rain was nearing us and we knew we had better get headed back to the car. After finishing up the exposure, we quickly packed up and headed back, having been there shooting for only 15 minutes. But I was ecstatic already because I knew I had something very cool! Our hands literally were reaching for the doors when the rain unleashed and began to downpour.

The next couple of days were fairly wet, though I did shoot Mono a couple more times. I don’t remember getting so many images from one location in such a relatively short period of time that I love so much! It’s going to be difficult for me to edit these down to 5, let alone 2 or 3! Well, there’s certainly worse problems to have and I’m okay with this one!

This image is on of my top favorites from the trip. I loves it’s simplicity-while-remaining-dynamic, and it reminds me of an iceberg – which I long to photograph. The light is perfect with the stormy backdrop and the late afternoon light coming in from behind to light up the tufas. I couldn’t have choreographed it any better!


Half Dome and Storm

HALF DOME AND STORMI have just returned from an EPIC trip up the Eastern Sierra’s to Yosemite and back. It was an amazing trip and perhaps one of my more successful photographic trips. The first couple of days offered clear skies and then we were lucky with striking (literally) thunderclouds and stormy weather the rest of the week. I climbed Half Dome early in the week with a couple of friends. What an experience! It took us 11 hours to get up to the top and back down and was approximately 18 miles with 4800′ of elevation gain. I’ll post more images from this trip in the coming weeks.

We had a group site at Hodgdon Meadow and there were a good number of family and friends there in Yosemite for the 4 nights. This image was while spending the day running around with my parents, showing them what it is I do. It was a kick and both of them took to “the chase”, especially my mom who I am convinced is a closet storm-chaser! When we were amongst the lightning and hail, she was hootin’ and hollerin’.

We stopped here because we saw a bolt of lightning over Half Dome. I got so excited already visualizing a final image with Half Dome, storm clouds and a lightning bolt! I tried for nearly an hour with one 60 second exposure after another but never had saw another bolt. I was happy with this capture, but man did I want that strike!

Several days later, while at Mono Lake (images coming soon) I was fortunate to catch a strike during my exposure, only to discover that it didn’t register through the 10-stop dark filter. :(   Well, check that off as a learning experience – I had no idea that that would happen! I guess I’ll have to buy one of those expensive lightning-strobe-thingies to attach to my camera so I can get the lightning next time…how else do you catch it in the daytime!?